Marc Ribot

Joe Henry Odds N Ends: Late Spring Edition

It’ll hit 90 degrees in Houston this week, so I figured time was running out to post any Late Spring JH news…

  • As previously mentioned, JH will appear at Over The Rhine’s Nowhere Else Festival over Memorial Day weekend.  You can get a clearer picture of what to expect at the festival’s website.
  • In addition to the new Allen Toussaint record (due June 10), there are several new production projects due in 2016:
    • Chely Wright’s new album I Am The Rain will be released in September.
    • Canadian singer-songwriter Rose Cousins has recorded a new record with JH and will be released later this year (you can pre-order the record from her website to receive it sometime prior the official release).
    • JH’s own website lists a new production from Austrian band Son of the Velvet Rat.
  • Stefan has a terrific new interview with Birds of Chicago, conducted while they were on tour in Europe.
  • JH will appear with Rosanne Cash on June 20 in Los Angeles at an event called Composed: The Intersection of Poetry and Song.  Reservations are closed but you can stand-by for admission on the day of the event.
  • JH will open for Rhiannon Giddens at her date this summer at Prospect Park Bandshell as part of the Celebrate Brooklyn! series (announcement on May 10).
    (UPDATE:  Sorry, this was from 2015 – my mistake.  But if you are going to be in the NYC area in July, why not check this out?)
  • There is an amazing interview with engineer Ryan Freeland, conducted by Steve Dawson for his Music Makers and Soul Shakers Podcast.  Dawson has also interviewed Bill Frisell, Mary Gauthier and, most recently, Marc Ribot.  (Also available on iTunes)
  • And speaking of Ribot, as you may recall, he and JH performed as a duo at the recent Big Ears Festival in Knoxville (read Josh Hurst’s review of the show here).  You can watch much of the performance on YouTube in four parts (see below).

Big thanks to Stefan Vandenberghe for keeping us updated when I am sometimes slacking off!

Joe Henry & Marc Ribot (Big Ears Festival, Apr 1): A review by Josh Hurst

{Ed. note: Knoxville’s Big Ears Festival has received widespread praise for its incredibly unique and adventurous lineup.  It should come as no surprise that Joe Henry and guitarist Marc Ribot should team up for such an event.  As luck would have it, our good friend (and JH aficionado), Josh Hurst,  has recently moved back to Knoxville and has kindly offered up this report from the show.  Many thanks to Josh for the contribution – enjoy…}

Knoxville, Tennessee’s much (and deservedly) ballyhooed Big Ears Festival is nothing if not diverse—this year’s lineup included moody jazz and electronics from Vijay Iyer and Wadada Leo Smith, druid drone from Sun O))), heady orchestrations from Laurie Anderson, saxophone catharsis from Kamsi Washington, and on and on—but if anything, the relentless parade of sound and color made the starkness of Joe Henry’s set stand out all the more. Joe was something like the troubadour in residence for the weekend revelry, one of the few (only?) performers to try leaving his audience spellbound and enraptured with nothing more than voice, song, and acoustic guitar; yet leave us spellbound and enraptured he did, not only because he performed highlights from all of his albums going back to Trampoline, but also because he was joined by acclaimed guitarist Marc Ribot on all but one song, plus reed man Levon Henry on three of them.

The setlist opened with “Trampoline” and concluded with a couple of songs off Invisible Hour; a stripped-down and spooky “Sold,” much-reworked “Like She Was a Hammer,” and ever-timely “Civil War” were additional highlights. I will take a moment of personal privilege to note the happy inclusion of my own favorite Joe Henry song, “Parker’s Mood.” Joe was in fine voice and good spirits, and Ribot, of course, tore it up, most notably with his frantic pyrotechnics on Blood from Stars’ bluesier numbers like “Bellwether” and “All Blues Hail Mary.” Levon’s highlight was likely “Eyes Out for You,” where his sax work reminded me of no one more than Sonny Rollins, encompassing the full vocabulary of the horn from sound effects/background ambiance to beautiful flights of melody.

Joe has toured just a bit more than usual in recent years, it would seem, and many who have attended these shows comment on the warmth present there, the generosity of spirit; Joe is a conceptual thinker who tends to have big ideas about recordings and performances, but the pleasure of his live shows is in how he just lets the songs and stories work their charms, no further unifying thread needed. The Big Ears performance seemed, from my vantage point up front, like it was well-received by the audience, and just in making my way into the theater I encountered people who’d driven in from Georgia, South Carolina, and even Pennsylvania (!!) for an all-too-rare opportunity to see our man at work. I don’t imagine any left disappointed, and personally, I stand by my conviction that Joe’s set was worth the Big Ears admission price all on its own.